Brexit, Greece

Brexit vs Grexit: The six stages of losing to the EU

Published: EUobserver

Both countries decided at some point that they could continue their relationship with Europe but without being bound by the rules that applied for everyone else. Indeed, they thought that an exception in their case could be enforced promptly and easily. “We will cancel the memorandum with a one-article law”, Tsipras said in 2012. In 2017 Liam Fox, the British minister for international trade, was making a similar assumption when he described the free trade agreement with the EU as “one of the easiest in human history” (…) Read full article

Standard
Brexit

Οι ψηφοφορίες στη βρετανική Βουλή είναι μία νίκη για το ήπιο Brexit

Για δεύτερη φορά, η Βουλή απέρριψε τους όρους του Brexit που συμφώνησε η πρωθυπουργός Τερέζα Μέι με τις Βρυξέλλες. Η Μέι θα επιμείνει και θα φέρει ξανά τη συμφωνία στη Βουλή, μέχρι να πείσει και τον τελευταίο βουλευτή που χρειάζεται.

Η χθεσινή ψηφοφορία είναι σημαντική για τους εξής λόγους:

Πρώτον, ανοίγει ο δρόμος για την οριστική εγκατάλειψη της απειλής περί άτακτης εξόδου χωρίς συμφωνία. Το απόγευμα η Βουλή θα καταψηφίσει το σκληρό Brexit. Tο έχει ήδη κάνει μία φορά, αλλά η τροπολογία είχε συμβουλευτικό χαρακτήρα. Τώρα, το Brexit μόνο με συμφωνία δεν θα είναι μεν δεσμευτικό, αλλά αύριο, θα ζητηθεί παράταση από την ΕΕ. Επομένως, ο νόμος εξόδου στις 29 Μαρτίου δεν θα έχει ουσιαστική ισχύ. Το χρονικό διάστημα θα το δούμε. Ναι μεν θα είναι μία περίοδος αβεβαιότητας, αλλά η Βρετανία βρίσκεται σε μόνιμη αβεβαιότητα από την ημέρα του δημοψηφίσματος.

Δεύτερον, η Τερέζα Μέι θα επιμείνει με τη συμφωνία της. Αρκετοί διαφωνούντες βουλευτές χθες άλλαξαν γνώμη, ενώ σε συμβολικό επίπεδο έχει σημασία η υπερψήφιση της πρότασή της από τον πρώην υπουργό Brexit, Ντέιβιντ Ντέιβις. Ο Ντέιβις είχε παραιτηθεί γιατί διαφωνούσε με το σχέδιο εξόδου της Μέι. Η μεταστροφή του είναι ένα μήνυμα ότι οι οπαδοί του Brexit αποδέχονται σιγά σιγά το γεγονός ότι οι αναβολές δεν βοηθάνε ούτε εκείνους.

Η πρωθυπουργός προτείνει ένα ρεαλιστικό και ήπιο Brexit, με τη σύμφωνη γνώμη της Ευρωπαϊκής Ένωσης. Άμεση έξοδος από τους ευρωπαϊκούς θεσμούς και έναρξη της περιόδου προσαρμογής για 2-3 χρόνια. Στη διάρκεια αυτής της τριετίας, η Βρετανία θα ακολουθεί όλους τους κανόνες, σαν να είναι πλήρες μέλος, επομένως οι αλλαγές στη ζωή των κατοίκων δεν θα είναι σημαντικές. Η νέα εμπορική συμφωνία θα περιλαμβάνει κάποιο είδος τελωνειακής ένωσης και πρόσβαση στην ελεύθερη αγορά. Οι βουλευτές που την καταψηφίζουν δεν προτείνουν τίποτε. Η πρωθυπουργός το επαναλαμβάνει διαρκώς, και το είπε και χθες το βράδυ, αμέσως μετά το τέλος της ψηφοφορίας: «Έφτασε πια η ώρα που η Βουλή θα βρεθεί αντιμέτωπη με τις διαθέσιμες επιλογές».

Αυτές ξέρουμε ποιες είναι: ‘Η το Brexit που προτείνει η Μέι, ή ένα ακόμη πιο ήπιο που θα επιβάλλουν οι φιλοευρωπαϊστές βουλευτές. Είναι πιθανό, αλλά σε καμία περίπτωση σίγουρο, το Brexit που θα επιλέξει τελικά η Βουλή να τεθεί σε δημοψήφισμα. Αυτό όμως θα το δούμε σε ύστερο χρόνο.

Τρίτον, εκτός από το να μετράμε τις ήττες της Μέι, πρέπει να μετρήσουμε και τις ψήφους αυτών που υποτίθεται ότι την κερδίζουν. Δεν φτάνουν για σκληρό Brexit. Η βουλή είναι φιλοευρωπαϊκός θεσμός, οι μετριοπαθείς βουλευτές είναι πολύ περισσότεροι από τους φανατικούς Brexiteers.

Τέταρτον, στην ιστορία υπάρχει και η άλλη πλευρά που πολλές φορές τα κράτη-μέλη ξεχνάνε όταν είναι απορροφημένα σε υποθέσεις που θεωρούν αποκλειστικά εθνικές, χωρίς όμως να είναι. Η Ευρωπαϊκή Ένωση θα συναινέσει μόνο σε ήπια έξοδο των Βρετανών.

Απόψε, λοιπόν, η Βουλή δεν θα εγκρίνει απλώς το Brexit με συμφωνία, αλλά θα δεχθεί εμμέσως, πλην σαφώς και επισήμως, ότι οι Βρυξέλλες θα συναποφασίσουν με τους Βρετανούς τον τρόπο εξόδου.

Standard
Brexit, Greece, UK Politics

Brexit vs Grexit: The six stages of losing to the EU

Published: EUobserver

As Theresa May is trying to convince Brussels to accept Britain’s terms for exiting the EU, the international community is almost certain that the attempt will fail.

The British government will persist in presenting the negotiations as a national success irrespective of the outcome.

May’s venture seems very similar to the last, failed attempt by Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras in 2015 to persuade Brussels to accept his terms for a memorandum on financial assistance, when a huge negotiation failure was presented to the public as the best possible deal with the EU.

Actually, Britain has already passed through, successively and with exact precision, all of the stages that the Greek government also had to endure during its own negotiations with Brussels.

Stage 1: There’s always a better (super-easy) deal

Both countries decided at some point that they could continue their relationship with Europe but without being bound by the rules that applied for everyone else.

Indeed, they thought that an exception in their case could be enforced promptly and easily.

“We will cancel the memorandum with a one-article law”, Tsipras said in 2012. In 2017 Liam Fox, the British minister for international trade, was making a similar assumption when he described the free trade agreement with the EU as “one of the easiest in human history”.

Stage 2: Domino effect

When Europe failed to succumb to their demands, imaginary allies entered the equation.

According to the rhetoric of both Syriza and the Brexiteers, their countries were also speaking on behalf of neighbours who shared their desire for a head-on confrontation with the European Union.

“The political change in Greece will trigger a domino effect in Europe, beginning in the south,” Tsipras predicted in 2014.

“We will trigger a domino effect. After us, other northern European countries will leave, starting with Denmark”, said Nigel Farage immediately after the referendum.

Stage 3: Constructive ambiguity (aka ‘Plan B’)

Throughout the negotiations, Britons and Greeks claimed that the vagueness with which they treated the pressing questions of the EU was a deliberate tactical manoeuvre.

“Constructive ambiguity is absolutely necessary in our discussions with our EU partners,” Yanis Varoufakis was saying in 2015.

“You will find it difficult sometimes to read what we intend. That’s deliberate. I’m afraid in negotiations you do have constructive ambiguity from time to time, to borrow a nice phrase”, said David Davis in 2017.

The negotiations came to an impasse, whereupon constructive ambiguity was renamed ‘Plan B’ in both countries; Plan B is also obscure, and again supposedly a tactical ploy.

Stage 4: We’re in trouble

“The night of the referendum I walked into the office of Alexis Tsipras and he was completely discouraged and depressed,” said Varoufakis in 2015.

“Boris Johnson did not want to win the referendum. He would have preferred to lose by a small margin,” Sir Alan Duncan said in 2016.

Both the Greek prime minister and the former British foreign secretary supported the side that won, but the day after the referendums they were called upon to manage situations that had slipped out of their control.

Stage 5: Great hopes or self-deceptions

When the winners of the referendums came face to face with reality, they again sought refuge in emotional statements to justify their previous optimism, though this time with a personal tone.

Tsipras said that the only thing his political opponents could reproach him for was “his illusions” that Europe would retreat before his leftist ideals.

In a similar statement, Davis, the original minister for exiting the European Union, said that he did not intend to apologise simply because he had had “great hopes” about the deal that his country could make with the EU.

It is very interesting that while both politicians are describing the same failure, they fall back on the ideological archetypes of their parties to justify themselves in the eyes of their voters.

Confronting a left-wing audience Tsipras plays the part of a deceived Don Quixote; Davis assumes the role of a determined strongman trying to reach the top by his own efforts but without the support of a system he trusts.

Stage 6: Let’s blame the negotiation

When no solution works, the problem is attributed to the negotiator and the deal he or she negotiated.

Someone else would have done better. The deals agreed are described in dramatic terms of irreversible disaster.

The memorandums before the Syriza-era were presented by Tsipras as agreements that would keep Greece “bound by its creditors forever”.

According to Davis, Theresa May’s Chequers terms would keep Britain “trapped forever within the EU”.

So, May and Tsipras embarked on a new negotiation, conveying national demands for a last stand.

The internal processes (referendum in the Greek case, the vote at Westminster for May) were presented to Brussels as democratic commandments of historical importance that bind not only the national governments that brought them to the negotiating table, but also the negotiators on the other side of that table.

We know the outcome of the six stages of the Greek negotiation.

It remains to be seen how May’s Stage 6 will play out. If however we wish to have an idea of how Brussels will deal with the demands of the British parliament, we should remember how it reacted to the decisive defeat of the bail out terms in the Greek referendum of 2015.

They ignored it.

Standard
Brexit, UK Politics

Άρθρο 50 εναντίον Τερέζα Μέι

Την περασμένη Παρασκευή η Τερέζα Μέι ανακοίνωσε ότι η Βρετανία σκοπεύει να ζητήσει περίοδο μετάβασης δύο ετών για την ολοκλήρωση του Brexit. Τα δύο επιπλέον χρόνια θα αρχίσουν να μετράνε αντίστροφα στις 29 Μαρτίου του 2019, καταληκτική ημερομηνία των διαπραγματεύσεων που προβλέπει το άρθρο 50. Αυτό πρακτικά σημαίνει ότι το 2021, πέντε χρόνια μετά το δημοψήφισμα της 23ης Ιουνίου του 2016, το Ηνωμένο Βασίλειο δεν θα έχει υλοποιήσει την εντολή του εκλογικού σώματος.

Continue reading

Standard